Improving Energy Efficiency of Residential Buildings QLD

Improving Energy Efficiency of Residential Buildings QLD

Improving Energy Efficiency and Resilience of Residential Buildings - On Demand webinar

3 Hours/ 3 Formal CPD points

OVERVIEW

This formal CPD aims to provide a better understanding of how the 2022 NCC changes and requirements for residential energy efficiency and QLD Resilient Home Guidance (Resilient homes | Queensland Reconstruction Authority (qra.qld.gov.au) may impact the design, climate resilience and affordability of housing in QLD.

The presentations by experts and discussion panels are framed by the following questions:

- What do architects need to know at the start of the project to achieve energy targets beyond code compliance?
- What are the benefits and risks associated with installation of EV charging capability in apartments buildings?
- How can the NCC 2022 energy efficiency requirement be customised to Queensland context? What strategies and practical solutions can be adopted in QLD to achieve energy efficiency in residential buildings leading towards a net zero built environment?
- What strategies and practical solutions can QLD architects adopt to enhance climate resilience in residential design successfully?
- What is the next step for energy efficient and resilient housing in QLD?

 

SESSION 1: NCC 2022 AMENDMENTS - INTENT AND IMPACT

Part A: Big Picture - Residential building tools in Australia. What do architect need to know to achieve energy targets beyond code compliance?
The presentation aims to provide a better understanding of (1) fundamental issues that influence contemporary building and construction industry; (2) mandatory and voluntary options for energy efficiency on the residential sector; and (3) updates in NATHERS (2022) - Whole of home assessments and ratings. Dr Iyer-Raniga reviews residential thermal rating and ESD rating tools so that architects can easily determine which tool might be most appropriate for their location, assessment type and needs, particularly if they wish to achieve energy or sustainability targets beyond code compliance.

Part B: What are the NCC 2022 requirements for the installation of EV Charging in apartment buildings and what are the main concerns this creates?
The NCC 2022 requirements for installation of Electric Vehicle (EV) Charging in apartments building raised concern about potential hazard associated with current storage battery / charging station technologies including lithium-ion batteries. While these requirements are not regulatory, the mutual understanding of the benefits and risks of new technologies can help to promote their implementation into buildings. A professional discussion on the topic and analysis of the recent case studies will clarify the readiness of architects and designers for implementing of EV charging into new building and retrofitting. A cross disciplinary discussion panel has been instigated by Queensland architects, members of Climate Action and Sustainability Committee. Panelists will share their thoughts, experiences and expertise in provision of EV charging in apartment buildings from various professional perspectives. The discussion will be focused on the following questions:

1. What are the challenges associated with retrofitting existing apartment buildings with EV charges in their parking spaces?;
2. What are the strategies for effective installations of EV Charges in new apartment buildings, from an electrical engineering perspective?
3. What are the biggest issues and benefits with battery storage in apartment buildings?
4. What are the challenges and practical solutions for managing EV fire risk in apartment buildings?
5. What challenges do architects face when dealing with the implementation of the NCC 2022 requirements for the installation of EV Charging in apartment buildings?

 

SPEAKER - PART A

Prof Usha Iyer-Raniga
PROFESSOR, RMIT UNIVERSITY

Usha is a Professor at the School of Property, Construction and Project Management at RMIT University. She is also the Co-Lead of the United Nations One Planet Network’s (OPN) Sustainable Buildings and Construction Program (SBC), (10YFP) on Sustainable Consumption and Production aligned with SDG12.

SPEAKERS - PART B

Andrew Watson, FRAIA (MODERATOR)
DIRECTOR, WATSON ARCHITECT

Andrew Watson has over 25 years’ experience in commercial and residential architecture, town planning, conservation, and refurbishment of historic and existing buildings. Andrew  has specialist qualifications in architectural conservation (heritage) from the Institute of Advanced Architectural Studies, at the University of York. He has been a board member of The National Trust of Queensland and is a member of Australia ICOMOS (International Council on Monuments and Sites).
Callum Senjov, RAIA
ARCHITECT, ARCHITECTUS CONRAD GARGETT

Callum is an Architect at Architectus Conrad Gargett, with a portfolio of multi-residential, commercial, and public works. Undertaking projects in breadth from large international projects to regional, temporary builds, Callum has witnessed the power that good design has to invigorate place and is a firm believer in the role that architects and designers have in creating a resilient and equitable future.

Paul Worroll, LFRAIA
MANAGING DIRECTOR, REDDOG ARCHITECTS

Paul is a proud signatory to the Architects Declare movement and a passionate advocate for encouraging architects to become thought leaders in making sustainability a priority for everyone. Paul demonstrates his belief that sustainability should be an inherent part of architectural thinking. He has recently been recognised by his peers for his contributions to architecture and been elevated to a Life Fellow of the Institute.

Xavia Troeger
ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR & NATIONAL SPECIALIST SERVICES LEAD, ADP CONSULTING

Xavia began her career as a mechanical engineer and has since specialised in fire engineering, both in fire protection design and fire safety performance-based engineering. She worked on landmark projects such as Commonwealth Games Carrara and Coomera sporting and entertainment centres, Mater Springfield Hospital and Valley Metro Redevelopment.

Toby Murdoch
ASSOCIATE, ASHBURNER FRACIS CONSULTING ENGINEERS

Ashburner Francis is a specialist building services engineering firm with offices in Brisbane, Toowoomba, Townsville, and Darwin. We service all areas of Australia and the Asia-Pacific region. We provide independent, professional engineering design, consultancy, and asset management services for all building services including electrical, mechanical, hydraulic, fire, energy efficiency and renewable energy systems.

 

LEARNING OUTCOMES

On completion of this session, the learners should be able to:

- Better understand and compare the effectiveness of the NCC Verification Methods of building performance in different climatic zones in Australia.
- Identify the location's most appropriate residential energy rating tools to achieve energy target beyond code compliance.  
- Evaluate and select strategies and practical solutions to implementation of requirements for Electric Vehicle charging provision in apartment buildings. 

NSCA 2015 Performance Criteria

PC 2.6 Preparation and analysis of project development options in response to project brief.
PC 3.3 Design response incorporates assessment of the physical location and relevant wider regional, contextual and environmental issues.
PC 3.4 Design response incorporates assessment of relevant legislation, codes and industry standards.
PC 4.2 Evaluation of design options against values of physical, environmental and cultural contexts.

NSCA 2021 Performance Criteria

PC 12 Provide independent, culturally responsive and objective advice in accordance with relevant building codes, standards, technical specifications and guidelines, and planning regulations, including climate change implications, across all aspects of architectural practice.
PC 16 Be able to apply risk management and mitigation strategies – including safety in design, project risk, requirement for resilience from the impacts of climate change and appropriate insurances – across architectural services.
PC 24 Be able to prepare and analyse project development options in response to a project brief – its objectives, budget, user intent and built purpose, risk and timeframes, including environmental sustainability considerations.

SESSION 2: BEYOND ENERGY EFFICIENCY FOR APARTMENTS BUIDLINGS IN QUEENSLAND

The value of reducing energy consumption is rapidly increasing in Australia and globally. Consideration and implementation of energy efficiency during the design, selection construction and building materials, construction stage and operation of the building plays a critical role in sustainable development. The NCC 2022 amended the requirements for residential energy efficiency provision for low rise multiple dwelling projects (Class 1 buildings), apartment buildings (Class 2 sole-occupancy units) and Class 4 parts of buildings. The NCC 2022 changes will impact all new residential and retrofitting of the existing multi-residential buildings in Australia-wide. This session will discuss what might be required beyond the current round of changes to the NCC energy efficiency requirements to meet Australia's net zero 2050 goals. The session will examine what is currently being done in multi-residential buildings to reduce operational and embodied carbon footprints.

Part A: The total environmental impacts of the residential building’s lifespan in Queensland.
This presentation will discuss the environmental impacts of typical or average dwellings in Queensland, both during construction and throughout their lifetime. While the 2022 update of the National Construction Code widens the scope of energy efficiency regulations to include hot water system, cooking and plug loads, there are still substantial impacts that remain outside regulation. This presentation will examine what energy is currently used for in average Queensland dwellings, what percentage of this energy is currently captured by energy efficiency regulations, and the extent that the NCC regulations are modified by or undercut by the Queensland Development Code. Additionally, the presentation will examine how the environmental impacts of the extraction and manufacture of building materials (also known as embodied impacts) contribute to the total environmental impact of typical dwelling.

Part B: operational and embodied carbon in multi-residential buildings.
This presentation covers how operational and embodied carbon is understood, measured and reduced at each phase of the design and documentation of complex multi-residential buildings in Queensland.

Part C: What is the next step for improving energy-efficiency of residential buildings in QLD?
This panel aims to engage professionals, scientists, and government’s officials in the thought-provocative discussion focused on the following questions:

1. As we make progress towards a net zero built environment, what has turned out to be relatively easy to achieve, and what is currently in the 'too hard' basket?
2. What do architects (and their clients) need to know at the start of a project that aims to understand or reduce embodied carbon?
3. Who is leading whom in this process? Are clients coming to architects with ambitious targets? Are architects pushing clients and consultants towards bigger goals? Are engineers pushing for change once they're on the project team?
4. How can incentive schemes encourage innovative approaches to the reduction of operational and embodied carbon footprints of residential buildings?
5. How can the QLD climatic conditions impact the performance of renewable solar for residential buildings? What are the principles and benefits of comprehensive design solutions compare to the conventional pre-designed system?

SPEAKER - PART A

Dr Paul Matthews
LECTOR, UNIVERSITY OF QUEENSLAND

Paul is currently researching the ongoing environmental impacts of the existing built environment in South East Queensland, and what built environment professionals can do to reduce these impacts. He is also a registered architect involved in retrofitting, maintenance and improvement projects for older multi-residential buildings in South East Queensland and Northern NSW.

SPEAKER - PART B

Andrew Noonan, RAIA
SUSTAINABLE DESIGN LEAD, HASSELL

Andrew is passionate about making positive change through the application of regenerative design principles. Hi is an advocate for the important role that large-scale civic projects play in shaping the cities and environments of the future, providing incredible potential for outcome that are better than net zero - not just for the building themselves, but also for their surrounding communities. 

SPEAKERS - PART C

Dr Paul Matthews (MODERATOR) 
LECTOR, UNIVERSITY OF QUEENSLAND

Paul is currently researching the ongoing environmental impacts of the existing built environment in South East Queensland, and what built environment professionals can do to reduce these impacts. He is also a registered architect involved in retrofitting, maintenance and improvement projects for older multi-residential buildings in South East Queensland and Northern NSW.
Dr Rosemary Kennedy, LFRAIA
DIRECTOR, SUBTROPICAL CITIES CONSULTANCY

After a decade of heading up QUT's Centre for Subtropical Design Rosemary started her consultancy offering strategic design advice and review, collaborative processes and training that is based on my skills and knowledge of climate-responsive city-making architecture and design. Rosemary is driven by her passion for the tropical and subtropical way of life and the pursuit of a liveable and just future. 

Eddie Springer
DIRECTOR, SPRINGER SOLAR

Eddie joined the Springers Solar 18 years ago to apply the skills he had learnt in the Construction and Contract Administration industry working for Watpac Constructions. Eddie is a director of Springers Solar with his brothers Joe and Mick Springer.  The renewable energy, residential and commercial solar market was beginning to emerge from its infancy in Australia and Eddie saw an opportunity to capitalize on this market by bringing professional building and construction skills as well as quality policies and procedures to the projects division of Springers Solar. Eddie has continued to drive productivity and innovation in this division and has been instrumental in allowing Springers Solar to grow as a trusted brand for quality installations and installation excellence. Springers Solar is now a 20 year old solar company.   Eddie now works with Architects, Engineers, building designers and home owners to ensure that the energy system design and installation goals are managed from the concept stage through to system installation, commissioning and training.

Ben Gibbs
ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR, QUEENSLAND SUSTAINABILITY TEAM at WSP

Ben has extensive sustainability focussed consulting experience, working across many sectors and on major, city shaping built environment projects as assisting clients and organisations transition to net zero carbon and set strong and measurable ESG strategies. Ben is passionate about creating a more sustainable built environment and regularly shares his knowledge on industry panels, committees and at conferences with organisations including Engineers Australia, the Property Council of Australia and the Green Building Council of Australia. Ben is a Chartered Professional Engineer and holds accreditations with numerous key sustainability industry certification systems including Green Star, International WELL Building Institute, Fitwel, LEED and Climate Active. Ben has been recognised by the GBCA as a Green Star Champion for his contribution to improving the sustainability of the built environment and delivering a low emissions future and currently sits on the GBCA People and Wellbeing Expert Reference Panel and was a finalist in the 2022 Property Council of Australia's Future Leader of the Year.

Dr Clyde Anderson
CERTIFIED ENERGY EFFICIENCY ASSESOR & CERT IV NATHERS ASSESSMENT & EXEC DIRECTOR, ANDERSONS ENERGY EFFICIENCY

Dr Anderson specialises in certified building energy efficiency assessments for compliance to the National Construction Code and wide-ranging energy consulting. From single-room house extensions to multi-storey skyscrapers, hotels, schools, offices, warehouses, airports, hospitals and shopping malls, we help clients achieve Code compliance at near-lowest construction cost and deliver quality compliance reports. He is highly experienced at performing all thermal assessment types according to the National Construction Code (and the Queensland Development Code if in QLD), including Residential/House Energy Ratings (“Star Ratings” or “HERS Assessments”), Deemed-To-Satisfy reports, Reference Building reports, Commercial JV3 reports and Energy Audits.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

On completion of this session, learners should be able to

- Better understand the challenges caused by implementing renewable energy technologies in the housing sector. 
- Comprehend how operational and embodied carbon is defined, measured and reduced at each phase of the design and documentation of complex multi-residential buildings.
- Raise clients' awareness of available incentives for the use of innovative technologies. 
- Advocate for effectiveness of incentives for improvement of climate resilience and energy-efficient housing design.

NSCA 2015 Performance Criteria

PC 1.5 Knowledge of different procurement processes available and evaluation of the impact these have on the project.
PC 3.3 Design response incorporates assessment of the physical location and relevant wider regional, contextual and environmental issues.
PC 3.4 Design response incorporates assessment of relevant legislation, codes and industry standards.
PC 4.7 Coordination and integration of appropriate environmental systems, including for thermal comfort, lighting and acoustics.


NSCA 2021 Performance Criteria

PC 12 Provide independent, culturally responsive and objective advice in accordance with relevant building codes, standards, technical specifications and guidelines, and planning regulations, including climate change implications, across all aspects of architectural practice.
PC 16 Be able to apply risk management and mitigation strategies – including safety in design, project risk, requirement for resilience from the impacts of climate change and appropriate insurances – across architectural services.
PC 33 Be able to investigate, coordinate and integrate sustainable environmental systems including water, thermal, lighting and acoustics – in response to consultants’ advice.
PC 45 Be able to nominate and integrate quality and performance standards with regard to selected materials, finishes, fittings, components and systems, considering the impact on Country and the environment, and the whole life carbon impact of the project.

SESSION 3: STRATEGIES FOR IMPROVING CLIMATE RESILLIENCE AND ENERGY EFFICIENCY OF HOUSING IN QUEENSLAND

In 2019 Queensland Government (Queensland Reconstruction Authority) published Resilient Building Guidance for Queensland homes, including:
Flood Resilient Building Guidance for Queensland. Flood Resilient Building Guidance for Queensland Homes (February 2019) (qra.qld.gov.au)
Bushfire Resilient Building Guidance for Queensland Homes. Bushfire Resilient Building Guidance for Queensland Homes (qra.qld.gov.au)
Cyclone Resilient Building Guidance for Queensland Homes. Cyclone Resilient Building Guidance for Queensland Homes (December 2019) (qra.qld.gov.au)
All new buildings and major renovations of homes located within flood-hazard, bushfire-prone or cyclone-prone areas must comply with the current National and Queensland Building codes and standards. The legislative framework for Resilient Queensland Homes provides basic design requirements and provisions. However, it does not guide design solutions and the selection of resilient materials that are non-structural. Architects and designers involved in such projects must rely on professional judgement in developing effective, resilient strategies. Therefore, they would benefit from additional guiding materials and sharing practical experiences in this area.
This session will address architects' challenges in improving housing resilience to extreme weather events like bushfires, floods, and cyclones in QLD. The presenters will discuss case studies that demonstrate strategies and practical solutions that improve resilient and energy-efficient housing design in QLD.

Part A: Implementing flood-resilient design principles.
Resilience and adaptability are cornerstones of architecture and design as we navigate climate change. Whilst we cannot prevent floods from occurring, acknowledging the risk of flood means that we can design choices that help homeowners and businesses choose adaptive design, and selecting materials and construction that help to minimise damage caused by floodwater. Using case studies, this presentation will discuss how resilient design and building adaptability choices are changing our approaches for flood risk homes and businesses.

Part 2: Resilience of buildings. Beyond the minimum.
Building regulations coupled with insurance for assets provide resilience to the homeowner, business and government.  Major changes were made to regulations, housing design and construction due the devastation to the city of Darwin following Tropical Cyclone Tracy (1974). Damage investigations following cyclones over the subsequent decades have shown that there is positive step change in performance for life safety robustness of housing built after the code changes.  Dr. Henderson will provide insight into how contemporary building regulations adopt to the need for community resilience when subjected to the combined impacts of severe wind loads and wind driven rain ingress, which will be exacerbated by the poleward shift in cyclones. He will explain why building codes need better processes to enable resistance of coincident impacts (e.g. wind and rain) – so our communities can speedily recover. In mining the claims and damage data with the coincident wind field and rain intensity, common weaknesses (e.g. building envelope) that drive loss are quantified in terms of cost/benefit to enable targeted retrofitting for existing construction along with developing proposed code changes for future construction.

Part 3: Bushfire - Myths, Fallacies and Pitfalls.
Description

SPEAKER - PART A

Paul Worroll, LFRAIA
MANAGING DIRECTOR, REDDOG ARCHITECTS

Paul is a proud signatory to the Architects Declare movement and a passionate advocate for encouraging architects to become thought leaders in making sustainability a priority for everyone. Paul demonstrates his belief that sustainability should be an inherent part of architectural thinking. He has recently been recognised by his peers for his contributions to architecture and been elevated to a Life Fellow of the Institute.

SPEAKER - PART B

Dr David Henderson
CHIEF RESEARCH ENGINEER, CYCLONE TESTING CENTRE, JAMES COOK UNIVERSITY

David is Chief Engineer of the Cyclone Testing Station. Previous roles included a secondment as a Postdoctoral Researcher at the University of Western Ontario, Canada, where David was collaborating on the 3LP full scale house testing research project in the simulation of realistic wind loads impacting full scale timber framed housing. David undertook his doctoral research in 2006 to 2010, investigating the impact of cyclonic wind loading on low rise building envelopes. Prior to this, David was the Manager of the Cyclone Testing Station for five years. He has over sixteen years of experience as a research engineer conducting studies into low rise buildings and their components with the Cyclone Testing Station.

SPEAKER - PART C

Eldon Bottcher, FRAIA
DIRECTOR, CERTIFIED ASSESOR & FIREFIGHTER, ELDON BOTTCHER ARCHITECT

Eldon established Eldon Bottcher Architect on the Gold Coast in 1978, and became involved in the provision of Bushfire associated services in 2000 at the request of developers who wanted a higher standard of documents than that being provided by other consultants. Preparation of the Fire Management reports is carried out by Eldon Bottcher: the Principal of Eldon Bottcher Architect Pty Ltd who has a Graduate Diploma in Design in Bushfire Prone Areas from the University of Western Sydney, a Diploma in Architecture from Queensland Institute of Technology and a Certificate in Rural Fire Management from The University of Southern Queensland. Eldon is a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Architects, a member of the Australian Institute of Emergency Services, the Fire Protection Association of Australia, the Australian Institute of Engineers Society of Fire Safety, and of Guanaba Rural Fire Brigade (where he has been Chairman and Training Officer), and Clagiraba Rural Fire Brigade. He is accredited by the Fire Protection Association of Australia as a Level 3 practitioner in Bushfire Panning and Design, which is their highest level of accreditation. He is also an Associate Member of the Institution of Fire Engineers.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

On completion of this session the learners should be able to

- Better understand the strategies for improving resilient housing design in QLD within the categories of bushfires, floods and cyclones.  
- Analyse the impacts of the strategies and new NCC requirements on the design and affordability of housing in QLD climate zones.
- Critically evaluate strategic approaches to resilient housing design in QLD context.
- Advocate for the architect's role in designing resilient and affordable housing in QLD. 
- Better understand the wind-induced fatigue failure of building elements and the role of a full-scale house testing program in resilient housing design. 

NSCA 2015 Performance Criteria

PC 3.3 Design response incorporates assessment of the physical location and relevant wider regional, contextual and environmental issues.
PC 3.4 Design response incorporates assessment of relevant legislation, codes and industry standards.
PC 4.2 Evaluation of design options against values of physical, environmental and cultural contexts.
PC 4.4 Inclusion of expertise of relevant specialists and consultants in developing the project design.
PC 4.6 Investigation and integration of appropriate material selection for the project design.
PC 5.6 Integration of relevant technical services, environmental and transportation systems.

NSCA 2021 Performance Criteria

PC 12 Provide independent, culturally responsive and objective advice in accordance with relevant building codes, standards, technical specifications and guidelines, and planning regulations, including climate change implications, across all aspects of architectural practice.
PC 16 Be able to apply risk management and mitigation strategies – including safety in design, project risk, requirement for resilience from the impacts of climate change and appropriate insurances – across architectural services.
PC 24 Be able to prepare and analyse project development options in response to a project brief – its objectives, budget, user intent and built purpose, risk and timeframes, including environmental sustainability considerations.
PC 32 Be able to apply planning principles and statutory planning requirements to the site and conceptual design of the project.

PRICE 

FORMAL CPD: 3 POINTS
Non Members $237
Members $147
 

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